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Risk assessment

What is a risk assessment?

A risk assessment is a critical process that helps organizations identify, evaluate, and prioritize potential risks that can effect their operations. The primary objective of a risk assessment is to determine the likelihood and potential impact of each identified risk and develop strategies to mitigate them. 

What are the 4 types of risk assessment? 

The four types of risk assessment methods include qualitative, quantitative, semi-quantitative, and ecological risk assessments. Each method provides a unique approach to assessing risks and helps organizations make informed decisions based on the level of risk identified. 

  • Qualitative risk assessment involves a subjective analysis of the potential risks and their impacts, using categories such as high, medium, or low. This method is suitable for identifying and evaluating non-numeric risks, such as digital identity theft and fake users, and provides a quick overview of the organization’s overall risk exposure.
  • Quantitative risk assessment is a more objective approach to assessing risks, using numerical values and statistical analysis to determine the likelihood and severity of potential risks. This method is suitable for assessing risks related to financial loss, onboarding, and fraud, where numerical data can provide a more accurate assessment of the organization’s risk exposure.
  • Semi-quantitative risk assessment combines both qualitative and quantitative approaches, using numerical values to quantify the impact of risks while considering subjective factors such as the likelihood of occurrence. This method is useful for organizations that need to balance the benefits and risks of specific activities related to digital identity, such as implementing multi-factor authentication (MFA) or two-factor authentication (2FA).
  • Ecological risk assessment evaluates the potential environmental impact of specific activities related to digital identity, such as online transactions, to identify potential ecological risks and develop strategies to minimize them. 

Why are risk assessments important? 

Risk assessments are important for organizations because they help identify potential risks and develop strategies to mitigate them. By understanding the risks associated with digital identity, organizations can take proactive measures to minimize their risk exposure and protect their assets. 

What is the risk assessment matrix and how can it be used? 

The risk assessment matrix is a tool used to prioritize risks based on their likelihood and potential impact. The matrix categorizes risks in four ways: low likelihood/low impact, low likelihood/high impact, high likelihood/low impact, and high likelihood/high impact. 

The risk assessment matrix helps organizations prioritize risks related to digital identity based on their potential impact and develop appropriate mitigation strategies. For example, if the risk assessment matrix identifies a high likelihood and high impact risk related to phishing scams, the organization can prioritize implementing employee training or using anti-phishing software to minimize the risk of a data breach. 

What are the different phases in risk assessment? 

The risk assessment process typically involves five steps: identification, assessment, prioritization, mitigation, and monitoring. In the identification phase, organizations identify potential risks associated with digital identity, such as phishing scams, malware, and weak passwords. 

In the assessment phase, organizations evaluate the likelihood and potential impact of each identified risk, using one of the four risk assessment methods. In the prioritization phase, organizations use the risk assessment matrix to prioritize risks based on their potential impact related to digital identity. 

In the mitigation phase, organizations develop strategies to minimize the risks associated with digital identity, such as implementing MFA or 2FA, regularly updating software, and conducting employee training. In the monitoring phase, organizations continually monitor and evaluate their risk exposure and adjust their risk management strategies as needed.